Move a SSL certificate from Microsoft IIS 8 to Apache

To move a SSL certificate from Microsoft IIS 8 to Apache, the certificate must be converted from a PKCS#12 (.p12 or .pfx) to two separate files (private and public key).

Step 1: Export certificate in IIS 8

  1. From the web server, click Start
  2. In the Search programs and files field, type manage computer certificates
  3. From the search suggestions list, click Manage computer certificates
  4. At the permission prompt, click Yes
  5. Double click on the Personal folder, and then on Certificates.
  6. Right Click on the Certificate you would like to backup and choose > All Tasks > Export
  7. Follow the Certificate Export Wizard to backup your certificate to a .pfx file.
  8. Choose to ‘Yes, export the private key
  9. Choose to “Include all certificates in certificate path if possible.” (do NOT select the delete Private Key option)
  10. Enter a password you will remember
  11. Choose to save file on a set location
  12. Click Finish
  13. You will receive a message > “The export was successful.” > Click OK
  14. The .pfx file backup is now saved in the location you selected.

Step 2:  Convert PFX file to compatible files for Apache

Move the .pfx file to the Apache server.

To extract the private key, run the OpenSSL command:
openssl pkcs12 -in <filename>.pfx  -nocerts -out key.pem

To extract the certificate (public key), run the OpenSSL command:
openssl pkcs12 -in <filename>.pfx -clcerts -nokeys -out cert.pem

How to change network names on Windows 10

Firstly I take no credit for this, the original article can be found here.

When you connect to a network for the first time in Windows, Windows saves the network profile and assigns a name to it.

Connections using Ethernet (wired) use a generic name such as Network 7 usually while wireless networks the SSID of the Wi-Fi network the device connected to.

Some users and administrators may dislike the non-descriptive nature of wired network connections on Windows.

Good news is that it is possible to rename network profile names to make them more descriptive on the operating system.

The following guide was written for Microsoft’s Windows 10 operating system but the process should work in previous versions of Windows as well.

Changing the network name on Windows

You can check the current name in the Network and Sharing Center on Windows or in the Settings application on Windows 10.

  1. Tap on Windows-I to open the Settings application.
  2. Go to Network & Internet > Ethernet or Wi-Fi depending on the connection type.

The name of the network is displayed at the very top of the page.

To display the name in the Control Panel instead, do this:

  1. Tap on the Windows-key to activate the Start menu.
  2. Type Control Panel and select the result.
  3. Go to Network and Sharing Center

The name is listed under “view your active networks”.

Windows administrators and users have two main options to change a network name. The first involves editing the Windows Registry using Local Security Policy. Note that Local Security Policy is only available in professional versions of Windows, e.g. Windows 10 Pro.

Using the Windows Registry

I recommend that you back up the Windows Registry before you make any changes to it. Check out ghacks.net Windows Registry backup guide to find out how to do that.

  1. Open the Start Menu.
  2. Type regedit.exe and select the result to open the Registry Editor.
  3. Confirm the UAC prompt that is displayed.
  4. Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\NetworkList\Profiles
  5. The next step requires some trial and error. Windows lists all network connections with a unique ID and you need to click on each to check the ProfileName variable of it until you find the network name that you want to change.
  6. Double-click on ProfileName once you have found the right entry and type the new name of the network that you want used on the device. The change is only active on the device.

The change takes affect immediately. You can verify that by opening the Settings app or the Network and Sharing Center to verify that the name change was successful.

Repeat the process for any other network name that you want to change.

Webcam not working in Microsoft Teams

Recently my webcam had been playing up when joining Microsoft Teams meetings. Sometimes i’d connect to a call, audio works but video doesn’t. I could toggle the show/hide video icon and it would start working but it got worse and wouildn’t work at all.

After a bit of digging I found this article on the web and it was the following Powershell command that fixed it…

Get-AppxPackage -allusers Microsoft.WindowsCamera | Foreach {Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register "$($_.InstallLocation)\AppXManifest.xml"}

Add a guest to a team in Microsoft Teams

How do you add a guest to Microsoft teams? How does a guest join a team?

If you are trying to figure out how to add an external member to a full blown team, not just a chat or meeting then below are some articles on how to do this.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoftteams/guest-joins

A team owner in Microsoft Teams can add and manage guests in their teams via the web or desktop. Anyone with a business or consumer email account, such as Outlook, Gmail, or others, can participate as a guest in Teams, with full access to team chats, meetings, and files. Only people who are outside of your organisation, such as partners or consultants, can be added as guests. People from within your organisation can join as regular team members.

By default, guest access is turned off. So, before guests can join a team, an admin must turn on guest access in Teams. To do that, use the link below…

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoftteams/guest-access-checklist

If you are looking for general information on what microsoft teams is and how it works then the following video is pretty useful.

Office 2010 cmd activate or change product key

Yes it’s 2020 and we’re still messing around with Office 2010! If you’re having issues with license keys not working, activation problems etc then here’s a few useful commands.

Activate Office

Open CMD as Administrator.

cd c:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Office\Office14
cscript ospp.vbs /act

Change Product Key

cscript ospp.vbs /inpkey:XXXXX-YYYYY....

Connect to VPN from desktop in Windows 10

  1. Right click the Desktop and select New – Shortcut.
  2. In the shortcut target box, type or copy-paste the following command:
    rasphone -d "VPN connection name"
  3. Set the desired icon and name for your shortcut.

Once you do this, just click this shortcut to connect to a VPN directly. You can pop it anywhere you wish. To disconnect you can do the same but use the following instead…

rasphone -h “VPN connection name”

Outlook won’t accept “app password” after setting up MFA

So we use Exchange Online Plan 1 and Outlook 2016. After setting up Multi-factor Authentication for one of my email accounts I found that after a couple of days Outlook started popping up the password prompt for the account.

No matter how many times I tried it wouldn’t accept the “app password” i created here or the normal password for the account. After a bit of digging I found this article which suggested adding the following registry key which solved the problem for me.

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\16.0\Common\Identity
DisableADALatopWAMOverride
dword value 1

Export all AD groups and their members to CSV file

Export all Active Directory groups, the group category, group scope and all group members to a CSV file. Active Directory PowerShell module is required. Tested on Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2016. Amend $DateTime variable format and $CSVFile for path and filename.

#// Start of script 
#// Get year and month for csv export file 
$DateTime = Get-Date -f "yyyy-MM" 
 
#// Set CSV file name 
$CSVFile = "C:\AD_Groups"+$DateTime+".csv" 
 
#// Create emy array for CSV data 
$CSVOutput = @() 
 
#// Get all AD groups in the domain 
$ADGroups = Get-ADGroup -Filter * 
 
#// Set progress bar variables 
$i=0 
$tot = $ADGroups.count 
 
foreach ($ADGroup in $ADGroups) { 
    #// Set up progress bar 
    $i++ 
    $status = "{0:N0}" -f ($i / $tot * 100) 
    Write-Progress -Activity "Exporting AD Groups" -status "Processing Group $i of $tot : $status% Completed" -PercentComplete ($i / $tot * 100) 
 
    #// Ensure Members variable is empty 
    $Members = "" 
 
    #// Get group members which are also groups and add to string 
    $MembersArr = Get-ADGroup -filter {Name -eq $ADGroup.Name} | Get-ADGroupMember | select Name, objectClass, distinguishedName 
    if ($MembersArr) {  
        foreach ($Member in $MembersArr) {  
            if ($Member.objectClass -eq "user") { 
                $MemDN = $Member.distinguishedName 
                $UserObj = Get-ADUser -filter {DistinguishedName -eq $MemDN} 
                if ($UserObj.Enabled -eq $False) { 
                    continue 
                } 
            } 
            $Members = $Members + "," + $Member.Name  
        } 
        #// Check for members to avoid error for empty groups 
        if ($Members) { 
            $Members = $Members.Substring(1,($Members.Length) -1) 
        } 
    } 
 
    #// Set up hash table and add values 
    $HashTab = $NULL 
    $HashTab = [ordered]@{ 
        "Name" = $ADGroup.Name 
        "Category" = $ADGroup.GroupCategory 
        "Scope" = $ADGroup.GroupScope 
        "Members" = $Members 
    } 
 
    #// Add hash table to CSV data array 
    $CSVOutput += New-Object PSObject -Property $HashTab 
} 
 
#// Export to CSV files 
$CSVOutput | Sort-Object Name | Export-Csv $CSVFile -NoTypeInformation 
 
#// End of script

Original article found here https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/Export-all-AD-groups-and-3ae6fb42